Tag Archives: collapse

Endgame, The Premises: Derrick Jensen

Premise Seven:   The longer we wait for civilization to crash – or the longer we wait before we ourselves bring it down – the messier the crash will be, and the worse things will be for those humans and non-humans who live during it, and for those who come after.

Premise Eight:  The needs of the natural world are more important than the needs of the economic system.

Premise Nine:  Although there will clearly someday be far fewer humans than there are at present, there are many ways this reduction in population may occur.  Some will be characterized by extreme violence and privation. . . . Personally and collectively we may be able to both reduce the amount and soften the character of violence that occurs during this ongoing and perhaps long-term shift.

Premise Ten:  The culture as a whole and most of its members are insane.  The culture is driven by a death urge, an urge to destroy life.

Premise Eleven:  From the beginning, this culture – civilization – has been a culture of occupation.

Premise Twelve:  There are no rich people in the world,  and there are no poor people.  There are just people.  The rich my have lots of pieces of green paper that many pretend are worth something – or their presumed riches may be even more abstract:  numbers on hard drives at banks – and the poor may not.  These “rich” claim they own land, and the “poor” are often denied the right to make that same claim.  A primary purpose of the police is to enforce the delusions of those with lots of pieces of green paper.  Those without the green papers generally buy into these delusions almost as quickly and completely as those with.  These delusions carry with them extreme consequences in the real world.

Premise Thirteen:  Those in power rule by force, and the sooner we break ourselves of illusions to the contrary, the sooner we can at least begin to make reasonable decisions about whether, when, and how we are going to resist.

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Endgame, the Premises: Derrick Jensen

I’ve decided to begin writing again on Eve’s Daughter.  I’m going to finish up the premises of  Derrick Jensen’s work,  Endgame, and then move on to blogging my experience in becoming as self-sustaining as possible.  I’m getting chickens this year – maybe a goat, and I’m going to plant a garden.  I’m a complete novice with all of it, but what I’m lacking in experience I more than make up for with passion.  Still, it could get hilarious pretty quickly.

Premise Three:  Our way of living – industrial civilization – is based on, requires, and would collapse very quickly without persistent and wide-spread violence.

Premise Four:  Civilization is based on a clearly defined and widely accepted yet often unatrticulated hierarchy.  Violence done by those higher in the hierarchy to those lower is nearly always invisible, that is, unnoticed.  When it is noticed, it is fully rationalized.  Violence done by those lower on the hierarchy to those higher is unthinkable, and when it does occur is regarded with shock, horror, and the festishization of the victims.

Premise Five:  The property of those higher on the hierarchy is more valuable than the lives of those below.  It is acceptable for those above to increase the amount of property they control – in everyday language, to make money – by destroying or taking the lives of those below.  This is called production.  If those below damage the property of those above, those above may kill or otherwise destroy the lives of those below.  This is called justice.

Premise  Six:  Civilization is not redeemable.  This culture will not undergo any sort of voluntary transformation to a sane and sustainable way of living.  If we do not put a halt to it, civilization will continue to immiserate the vast majority of humans and to degrade the planet until it (civilization, and probably the planet) collapses.  The effects of this degradation will continue to harm humans and non-humans for a very long time.

Endgame, The Premises: Derrick Jensen

Premise Two

Traditional communities do not often voluntarily give up or sell the resources on which their communities are based until their communities have been destroyed.  They also do not willingly allow their landbases to be damaged so that other resources – gold, oil, and so on – can be extracted.  It follows that those who want the resources will do what they can to destroy traditional communities.

Endgame, the Premises: Derrick Jensen

Premise One:  Civilization is not and can never be sustainable.  This is especially true for industrial civilization.

Do you feel the rumblings?  Does your heart ache for something more simple, more free, more human, than what we have created?

I do.  Mine does.

Are you beginning to sense that something is not quite right?  Have you pinpointed the moment that your creativity, your wildness, your heart and soul and humanity, was co-opted?

I am.  I have.

Have you ever really thought about how this country became “ours”?  Does it make you uneasy and do you tell yourself that was a long time ago and we had nothing to do with it?  And then do you wonder about these wars we continue to fight?  Do you wonder about the people in Afghanistan and Iraq?  Do you comfort yourself by believing they are all terrorists, out to take our freedoms and our lifestyle, our manifested destiny?

Are you afraid to look, afraid to follow the crumbs back to their original source?  Is everything still working for you or is your home foreclosed, your job gone, your child hungry?  What will it take for you to see?

Is it beginning to occur to you that you, too, might get in the way of progress?  What if that is what you decided to do – get in the way of progress, before progress decides it for you?

Do you feel the rumblings?

 

Independence Day Down

We’ve celebrated another 4th of July, another Independence Day, here in the good ole U.S. of A.  I’m reminded that it was just about a year ago that I began to fully awaken to a bigger picture and what that might mean for all of us.  A bigger picture of peak oil,  continued environmental destruction, irreversible climate change, the collapse of industrial civilization.  Patriarchial structures, forms and systems are disintegrating.   We’re being de-illusioned and some are more prepared than others.

The anxiety I feel at times is unbearable, the dread and despair palpable, the fear a living thing.  I never reached the assurance of the spiritually delusional although I must admit to trying.  My higher power is a fierce goddess who allows no shrinking from painful realities; she is the dark mother and she knows that to be transformed one must first go through the fire. 

Yesterday was hard for me because I no longer overly identify with being American.  I don’t feel like celebrating an empire that committed genocide to take the land, that has deforested and dammed and laid waste and continues to act stupidly in the face of global warming and ecocide.  An empire that fights false wars under false pretenses, an empire in which the few are filthy rich and the many are struggling to stay afloat.  An empire that will stop at nothing to exploit every last resource down to the last drop of clean water, the last ancient tree, the last salmon, the last wage slave. 

It’s difficult, to say the least, to navigate in a culture committed to maintaining the status quo, a culture that admits no wrong and still wants to grow, grow, grow when it’s become obvious to a lot of us that growth is about done on this planet.  People look at me funny when I say our way of life is over, that right now is as good as it’s going to get, when I ask them to store food or start a garden.  They don’t want to hear it. 

People want to debate with me about GMO’s and I’m not interested in debating.  There are enough people with enough opinions and I struggle to write here because I don’t want to be just another person spouting their opinion, but I guess that’s what I am.   They tell me GMO’s will feed the starving people, they will lessen herbicide use, they will save the world.  Bullshit.

They tell me to lighten up, go to church, read something uplifting.  On good days the anxiety feels more like excitement and I feel I was born for these times.  I think there’s a job for me, but I’m not clear what it is.  So I keep reading and learning; I don’t flinch; I don’t look away.  I form visions of how we will get through this and I hold them.

But right now?  It ain’t looking too good.